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Developing Your Thesis

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❶The speaker ends this section by entreating the wind to "hear" him

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How to Come Up With a Thesis Topic

Try not to pick a topic that is too out-there, as it will be hard to generate interest in your thesis. You want a thesis topic that will hook the attention of others, as well as maintain your own attention. Remember, part of writing a thesis is having to defend it later. Thesis topics need to be easily manageable given factors such as your geographic area and the resources and facilities available to you.

The size of your thesis topic can be tricky; you want it to be manageable but not so narrow that you will be limited while researching. As you develop your thesis topic, always factor in your interests, strengths, and weaknesses. Try to develop two or three possible topics in case you encounter a lack of supporting information. You can bring your ideas to your advisor, who will help you determine which one is the most promising.

If your advisor is enthusiastic about your topic, he or she will be that much more invested in helping and supporting you. It can be very helpful to choose a broad subject area at first. As you read and research that subject area, you will narrow down toward a thesis topic. Your advisor can help you narrow it even further if you run into trouble. Organization is key to the entire thesis process, so get organized early on to reduce your stress levels.

As you search for your thesis topic, use the materials from your coursework, such as texts, notes and papers. Advice from your instructors and advisor is priceless during this process. You will also find a wealth of resources at your fingertips at your school and local libraries. Begin by brainstorming and doing some free-writing exercises to get your mind moving in the right direction. Talk to others about your ideas and research your topics to determine the potential availability of information about each one.

Make an outline to group your ideas and locate the crux of argument or problem on which you would like to focus.

For every writing assignment has, at the least, these two other purposes:. Consequently, all expository writing, in which you formulate a thesis and attempt to prove it, is an opportunity to practice rigorous, focused thinking habits that can result not only in better papers, but in sharper analytical skills across the board.

You may adapt this method to any nonfiction writing, including essays, research papers, book reports, or critical reviews. Choosing a Subject Suppose your instructor asks you to write an essay about a holiday experience. Within this general subject area, you choose a subject that holds your interest and about which you can readily get information: You wish to write about this. Limiting Your Subject What will you name your topic?

Simply calling your subject "St. You decide to limit the subject to "student behavior on St. You will title it much later. You have now limited your subject and are ready to craft a thesis. Crafting a thesis statement While your subject may be a noun phrase such as the one above, your thesis must be a complete sentence that declares where you stand on the subject.

A thesis statement should almost always be in the form of a declarative sentence. Your thesis might be, "A college town has to expect a certain amount of student glee on holidays such as St. Identifying supporting arguments Now you must gather material, or find arguments to support your thesis statement. Aristotle taught his students to examine any claim by "discovering arguments. Revising your thesis Notice that in the sentence above we used the phrase "a thesis statement" rather than "your thesis statement.

At this point, you should either revise your thesis or choose another subject and begin again. Revising your opinion in light of convincing evidence is the beginning of wisdom. Besides, even if it is possible to proceed with the essay as you first envisioned it, you will find it more difficult to defend a thesis you have previously discredited in your notes. These topic sentences will become the framework for the rest of your paper.

You will further support each with examples and citations from personal interviews, newspaper articles, or other appropriate references. Write the the question you have been assigned or the prompt you are going to answer with your essay in the box below. Either write the topic your teacher has assigned or the topic you have chosen in the space provided.

What do you have an opinion about? What are some things that interest you? What is one thing about your topic that you believe to be true, and that you wish to argue?

Is what you say always true always? Are there good reasons why your position may have a down side? How can you make your position have a reality check? What general reasons why your position may have problems can you admit up front?

Although schools of over a thousand students have flourished in America.

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Anticipate the counterarguments. Once you have a working thesis, you should think about what might be said against it. This will help you to refine your thesis, and it will also make you think of the arguments that you'll need to refute later on in your essay. (Every argument has a counterargument.

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Remember: These thesis statements are generated based on the answers provided on the form. Use the Thesis Statement Guide as many times as you like. Use the Thesis Statement Guide as many times as you like.

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Developing a thesis statement. Many papers you write require developing a thesis statement. In this section you'll learn what a thesis statement is and how to write one. If you do not yet have a position, making a cluster or a map with your topic in the center is a good way to help yourself find a position. Another good way is to begin a free write, “I’m supposed to write an essay about____________” and see where it takes you.

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Professor Karen Gocsik advises that developing a good thesis is often the result of finding the "umbrella idea." Finding this idea requires that students move back and forth between a text's particularities and its big ideas in order to find a suitable "fit" between the two that the students can write about. This handout describes what a thesis statement is, how thesis statements work in your writing, and how you can discover or refine one for your draft. The assignment may not explicitly state that you need a thesis statement because your instructor may assume you will include one. Writers use all kinds of techniques to stimulate their.